Facebook New Terms Of Service – Watch Out

A very old saying  Caveat Emptor or in english  “Buyer Beware” or in the case of Facebook, should I say to all 175 Million users in over 30 languages “Facebook User Beware”. They just changed there term of service agreement and they own your content. Yes I said that correctly, if you put something on Facebook, you are giving facebook rights to it forever.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a scary thought. The lawyers will have a field day to this and rightly so, Think of all the people who use Facebook. Celebrities all the way to the average Joe. I am not sure this is a reasonable stance for Facebook to take.

It use to be once you removed something from Facebook their rights to the information expired. With this most recent change, they own rights to the pictures, comments forever.  My hat goes off to The Consumerist who discovered this and is publishing this fact out to the world.

Here is a portion of that article…

Facebook’s New Terms Of Service: “We Can Do Anything We Want With Your Content. Forever.”

By Chris Walters, 6:14 PM on Sun Feb 15 2009

Facebook’s terms of service (TOS) used to say that when you closed an account on their network, any rights they claimed to the original content you uploaded would expire. Not anymore. Now, anything you upload to Facebook can be used by Facebook in any way they deem fit, forever, no matter what you do later. Want to close your account? Good for you, but Facebook still has the right to do whatever it wants with your old content. They can even sublicense it if they want.

You hereby grant Facebook an irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, fully paid, worldwide license (with the right to sublicense) to (a) use, copy, publish, stream, store, retain, publicly perform or display, transmit, scan, reformat, modify, edit, frame, translate, excerpt, adapt, create derivative works and distribute (through multiple tiers), any User Content you (i) Post on or in connection with the Facebook Service or the promotion thereof subject only to your privacy settings or (ii) enable a user to Post, including by offering a Share Link on your website and (b) to use your name, likeness and image for any purpose, including commercial or advertising, each of (a) and (b) on or in connection with the Facebook Service or the promotion thereof.

That language is the same as in the old TOS, but there was an important couple of lines at the end of that section that have been removed:

You may remove your User Content from the Site at any time. If you choose to remove your User Content, the license granted above will automatically expire, however you acknowledge that the Company may retain archived copies of your User Content.

To read the entire article….

The Consumerist Facebook New Terms of Service

I will end this blog as I started it…

A very old saying  Caveat Emptor or in english  “Buyer Beware” or in the case of Facebook, should I say to all 175 Million users in over 30 languages “Facebook User Beware”

After this blog came out, Facebook commented on this recent change to the terms of service….

On Facebook, People Own and Control Their Information

by Mark Zuckerberg Today at 2:09pm

A couple of weeks ago, we updated our terms of use to clarify a few points for our users. A number of people have raised questions about our changes, so I’d like to address those here. I’ll also take the opportunity to explain how we think about people’s information.

Our philosophy is that people own their information and control who they share it with. When a person shares information on Facebook, they first need to grant Facebook a license to use that information so that we can show it to the other people they’ve asked us to share it with. Without this license, we couldn’t help people share that information.

 

One of the questions about our new terms of use is whether Facebook can use this information forever. When a person shares something like a message with a friend, two copies of that information are created—one in the person’s sent messages box and the other in their friend’s inbox. Even if the person deactivates their account, their friend still has a copy of that message. We think this is the right way for Facebook to work, and it is consistent with how other services like email work. One of the reasons we updated our terms was to make this more clear.

In reality, we wouldn’t share your information in a way you wouldn’t want. The trust you place in us as a safe place to share information is the most important part of what makes Facebook work. Our goal is to build great products and to communicate clearly to help people share more information in this trusted environment.

We still have work to do to communicate more clearly about these issues, and our terms are one example of this. Our philosophy that people own their information and control who they share it with has remained constant. A lot of the language in our terms is overly formal and protective of the rights we need to provide this service to you. Over time we will continue to clarify our positions and make the terms simpler.

Still, the interesting thing about this change in our terms is that it highlights the importance of these issues and their complexity. People want full ownership and control of their information so they can turn off access to it at any time. At the same time, people also want to be able to bring the information others have shared with them—like email addresses, phone numbers, photos and so on—to other services and grant those services access to those people’s information. These two positions are at odds with each other. There is no system today that enables me to share my email address with you and then simultaneously lets me control who you share it with and also lets you control what services you share it with.

We’re at an interesting point in the development of the open online world where these issues are being worked out. It’s difficult terrain to navigate and we’re going to make some missteps, but as the leading service for sharing information we take these issues and our responsibility to help resolve them very seriously. This is a big focus for us this year, and I’ll post some more thoughts on openness and these other issues soon.

I placed Mark Zuckerbergs comments here for convience. Here is the link to the original….

 On Facebook, People Own and Control Their Information 

Posted Michael Corey,

Founder & CEO, Ntirety

www.ntirety.com

Twitter: Michael_Corey

Twitter: Ntirety

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